wcsp2009 is coming
 
Introduction to China > Nanjing

Sharing the honor of being one of the traditional "Four Great Ancient Capitals of China" with Beijing, Luoyang and Xi'an, Nanjing has a wealth of historical sights and attractions to offer—primarily from its early Ming Dynasty heyday—as well as the modern conveniences and emerging cosmopolitan lifestyle of contemporary urban China.

A major university town, Nanjing is home to a large student population, including many foreign students, and the city's youthful population fuels a lively nightlife scene. With a new subway, an easy-to-use bus system and cheap taxis, transportation within the city is easy, and it is well connected to Shanghai, Beijing and other major cities throughout China.

    All told, Nanjing can be a very pleasant city, with tree-lined streets, lakes, parks and its own mountain, Zijin Shan (Purple Gold Mountain) balancing the inevitable ranks of new skyscrapers and increasingly congested streets.

History

    Nanjing has a colorful and tumultuous history full of romantic characters, epic battles and several of the darker moments in China's—and the world's—history. Nanjing's present location on the Yangzi River was the site of ancient cities going back to the rival Wu and Yue Kingdoms of the volatile Spring and Autumn Period and the fifth century BC. Under a variety of names, the city now known as Nanjing served as capital of the Wu and several other southern regional powers until the Sui Dynasty reunited China in 581 AD, destroying Nanjing (then known as Jiankang) in the process.

    After a period of recovery, Nanjing returned to the center stage of Chinese history as capital of the southern Tang Kingdom (937-975) that formed after the collapse of the Tang Dynasty and quickly fell to the ascendant Song Dynasty. It was the first Ming emperor, Zhu Yuanzhang, who first made Nanjing capital of all China in 1368. He spent 21 years directing the construction of the Nanjing City Wall, much of which stands to this day. Subsequent Ming rulers returned the capital to Beijing, leaving Nanjing to thrive as a center of commerce and industry without the honor of hosting the imperial court. A very different bunch would return Nanjing to capital status: the zealous long-haired pseudo-Christian rebels of the Taiping Rebellion, who seized Nanjing in 1853, slaughtering tens of thousands and renaming it Tianjing ("Heavenly Capital"). They waged a surprisingly successful campaign against the beleaguered Qing Dynasty—who, in 1842, had signed the first of several "unequal treaties" with England in Nanjing, ceding control of Hong Kong and creating a number of treaty ports as a result of the first Opium War—conquering much of southern China before falling before the united forces of the Qing and Western forces, including the famous "Ever Victorious Army" led by Charles "Chinese" Gordon. This period is well represented by Nanjing's excellent Taiping Kingdom History Museum.

    Nanjing was proposed as the capital after the 1912 rebellion disposed of the Qing and established the Republic of China under the leadership of Sun Yat-sen. However, it wasn't until 1927 when Chiang Kai-Shek's Kuomintang made it their capital. The honor turned into tragedy when, in the run-up to World War II, the Japanese, after taking Shanghai and many other parts of China, brutally assaulted the Kuomintang capital, killing somewhere between 200,000 and 350,000 civilians. This dark episode, known as the "Rape of Nanking" has gained increasing attention in recent years (a major Chinese film with Hollywood funding is due out in 2007 and the recently expanded Nanjing Massacre Memorial and Museum bears witness to the tragedy) as China has sought, without much success, a formal apology from the Japanese government for the epic atrocity, and remains a major point of contention between the two nations.

    After the war, the Kuomintang returned to their capital, only to fall to the People's Liberation Army in 1949. In the 1950s, Mao Zedong's government made Nanjing a major component of its drive to industrialize, and the city remains a major industrial center today, drawing major international investment thanks to its infrastructure and location. A major testament to the efforts of the early PRC is the Yangzi River Bridge, which was completed in 1968 by Chinese engineers and laborers after the Soviet Union withdrew its assistance following the historic split between the USSR and PRC. The bridge is a late addition to Nanjing's wealth of historical attractions, many of which have been spared the worst vagaries of the Cultural Revolution and China's recent economic boom times. For more on Nanjing's history museums, see our Nanjing Museums & Galleries listings.

Climate

    Known as one of the "furnaces of China," Nanjing, situated in the Yangzi River valley, experiences hot and humid summers, with temperatures running well into the 30s Centigrade (90s F) between June and early September. Winters remain damp, making temperatures that occasionally dip below freezing feel colder. Spring and fall are the most pleasant times to visit, especially April and May and September and October, when temperatures require the occasional sweater or jacket after sunrise and in the early morning, but usually warm to perfect shirtsleeve weather by midday. June through August can be quite rainy, as it is part of the East Asia Monsoon weather system. Air quality suffers from automobiles and industry, often adding a thick haze to the humidity during days with little wind.

Introduction to Confucius Temple (Nanjing)

Perched on north bank of the Qinhuai River, the Confucius Temple was originally built during the Song Dynasty. You may be bemused to discover that the temple is surrounded by tourist shops, snack bars, restaurants and entertainment arcades all signed in "Ming" and "Qing" style architecture. Confucianism has been reduced to a state of general "confusion" in the gong show flanking the temple walls. The Song Dynasty was a period of great Confucian revivalism and the temple here is considered to be one of the best preserved of its type in China. During the Ming Dynasty the temple was expanded as a school for children of the imperial court. The buildings on both sides of the Temple which are now small tourist shops were once study rooms for Confucian scholars. The Qinhuai River flows in front of the Temple and there is also a 110-meter-long screen stonewall (the largest in China) nearby, which can be viewed from the bridge  in front of the temple. A "Lantern Show" is held at the temple during the 1st to the 18th days of the Lunar Year.

  

How to get there

Located on Gongyuan Jie, near Fuzimiao Square

 

Introduction to Drum Tower

The Drum Tower is a classical two story building set amidst a secluded garden in the center of Nanjing with panoramic views of the city. Built in the 15th year of the reign of Hongwu during the Ming Dynasty (1382) and renovated during the Qing Dynasty, the scale of the building is unusual for Chinese architecture. The Tower originally housed two large drums, 24 small drums and other musical instruments. Today there is only one large but impressive drum remaining on the top of the tower. The drums were used to announce the arrival of the emperor and his court to Nanjing and to warn the city residents of danger. There is also a lovely little tea and snack house up here, which is usually blissfully quiet.

  

How to get there

Opposite Gulou Square

 

Introduction to Mochou Lake Park

Mochou Lake Park is a vast open area in the west of the city, consisting of pathways surrounding a lake. This is a place to get away from the city traffic and is also en route to the Nanjing Massacre Museum. Legend has it that during the Nan Dynasty, a poor girl named Mochou married a rich man in order to  pay for her father's burial. As if the death of her father was not enough, she was so unhappyily married that she jumped into the Mochou Lake and ended it all. In the present day, the lake is a pleasant place to kill a few hours and there are some great go-carts available here if you fancy a more dramatic death by high-speed cart collision.

 

How to get there

Located at 35 Hanzhongmen Dajie, about 100 meters from Shuiximen Bridge

 

 

Introduction to Presidential Palace

The Presidential Palace has a very long, rather complex history of changing hands and providing the stage for some landmark events. The site the Presidential Palace was once the Marquis of Guide’s Palace and Prince Han’s Palace in early Ming Dynasty.  During Qing Dynasty, the office of Liangjiang Governor-General was located here, and it was also the temporary dwelling place for Emperor Kangxi and Qianlong when they were inspecting there. Following the establishment of the Republic of China, Dr. Sun Yatsen took the oath of Provisional President in this very compound. After Japan’s defeat in WWII, then Nationalist Government returned to Nanjing in 1946 and in 1948 the compound became the Presidential Palace. While the architecture is impressive, the history is what defines it.

  

How to get there

Located on 292, Changjiang Lu, near the T-shaped intersection of Hanfu Jie and Changjiang Lu.

 

Introduction to Rain Flower Terrace

Nanjing's Rain Flower Terrace (Yuhuatai), a memorial complex and forest park, is a site of both political importance and religious devotion. Back in the tumultuous times of the Southern Dynasties (420-589 AD), Buddhist monk Yunguang found peace and enlightenment in the wooded area that comprises today's park. There, according to legend, a rain of flowers from Heaven showered the area in response to Yunguang's devotion, subsequently turning into colorful stones that you can still see today.

  Later, the park came to house memorials to political prisoners executed by the Kuomintang in the 1930s and 1940s. In the early 1950s, the newly established Communist government built several memorials, tombs and statues to commemorate the fallen; mourners and political figures pay their respects to this day. The Rain Flower Pebble Art Festival is held at the park at the end of September every year.

 

How to get there

Located at 215 Yuhua Lu, west of Yuhua Bridge.

 

Introduction to Xuanwu Lake

Hugging an impressive stretch of Nanjing's ancient city walls on its  western shore, its eastern shore graced with beautifully landscaped grounds, Xuanwu Hu (Xuanwu Lake) surrounds a set of charming garden islets connected by causeways, all within view of Nanjing's growing modern skyline on one side and the majestic rise of nearby Zijin Shan (Purple Gold Mountain) on the other.  

On pleasant days, Xuanwu Hu Park is alive with Nanjing residents out strolling, picnicking, flying kites, paddle-boating on the lake and otherwise enjoying this beautiful urban green space. Teahouses and vendors abound, as do odd nooks where, even on crowded days, a bit of privacy can be found. A great place for kids, the park houses playgrounds and a small zoo in addition to the paddle boats. Xuanwu's diverse gardens and groves change with the season, making return visits a delight as delicate spring cherry blossoms give way to the riotous floral colors of summer, which in turn fade into the more subdued shades of autumn.

Originally an imperial resort, the park became public property in 1911 with the collapse of the Qing Dynasty. The most impressive remnant of imperial days can be found at the southern end of the park, where the Ming-era Xuanwu Men (Xuanwu Gate) connects to a well-preserved section of the old city walls.

 

How to get there

The park can be accessed from many points around its circumfrance. The Xuanwu Men metro station provides direct access to the park and on of the three main causeways leading to the islands. In the north, Nanjing Zhan metro station (located in the main train station) provides access across Longpan Lu.

 

 
 
Copyright @ WCSP2015. All rights reserved. 苏ICP备09019353号